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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 284729, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/284729
Review Article

Genetic Susceptibility to Chagas Disease: An Overview about the Infection and about the Association between Disease and the Immune Response Genes

1Program of Biosciences Applied to Pharmacy, Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, Maringa State University, Avenida Colombo 5790, 87020900 Maringa, PR, Brazil
2Basic Health Sciences Department, Maringa State University, Avenida Colombo 5790, 87020900 Maringa, PR, Brazil
3Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Avenida Colombo 5790, 87020900 Maringa, PR, Brazil

Received 29 March 2013; Revised 9 May 2013; Accepted 31 May 2013

Academic Editor: Enrique Medina-Acosta

Copyright © 2013 Christiane Maria Ayo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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