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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 284873, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/284873
Review Article

The Role of Changes in Extracellular Matrix of Cartilage in the Presence of Inflammation on the Pathology of Osteoarthritis

1Department of Bioengineering, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
2Center for Bioengineering Research, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA

Received 3 June 2013; Revised 27 July 2013; Accepted 29 July 2013

Academic Editor: Martin Götte

Copyright © 2013 Maricela Maldonado and Jin Nam. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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