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This article has been retracted as it is found to contain a substantial amount of material from published papers. The three most plagiarized papers are: (1) I. Sekirov, S. L. Russell, L. C. Antunes and B. B. Finlay, “Gut microbiota in health and disease,” Physiological Reviews, vol. 90, no. 3, pp. 859–904, 2010. (2) V. M. Hubbard and K. Cadwell, “Viruses, autophagy genes, and Crohn’s disease,” Viruses, vol. 3, no. 7, pp. 1281–1311, 2011. (3) B. Khor, A. Gardet and R. J. Xavier, “Genetics and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease,” Nature, vol. 474, no. 7351, pp. 307–317, 2011.
BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 297501, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/297501
Review Article

Genetic and Functional Profiling of Crohn's Disease: Autophagy Mechanism and Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases

1Institute for Maternal and Child Health—IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo” of Trieste, Via dell’Istria 65/1, 34137 Trieste, Italy
2University of Trieste, 34127 Trieste, Italy

Received 27 February 2013; Accepted 20 March 2013

Academic Editor: Enrique Medina-Acosta

Copyright © 2013 Annalisa Marcuzzi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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