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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 302392, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/302392
Research Article

Membrane Localization of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase by CD44 Regulates the Activation of Pro-Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in Osteoclasts

Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, Dental School, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 10 March 2013; Revised 22 June 2013; Accepted 22 June 2013

Academic Editor: Sakae Tanaka

Copyright © 2013 Meenakshi A. Chellaiah and Tao Ma. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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