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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 345465, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/345465
Research Article

Characterization of the Phytochemical Constituents of Taif Rose and Its Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities

1Natural Products Analysis Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Taif University, P.O. Box 888, Taif-Alhaweih 21974, Saudi Arabia
2Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry, Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, P.O. Box 30, Imbaba, Giza, Egypt

Received 30 April 2013; Accepted 2 September 2013

Academic Editor: Elvira Gonzalez De Mejia

Copyright © 2013 El-Sayed S. Abdel-Hameed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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