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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 349129, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/349129
Research Article

Effects of Flavonoids on Rumen Fermentation Activity, Methane Production, and Microbial Population

1Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
2Agriculture Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran (ABRII), East and North-East Branch, P.O. Box 91735/844, Mashhad, Iran
3Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
4Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, International Branch, P.O. Box 91779/4888, Mashhad, Iran

Received 14 April 2013; Revised 12 August 2013; Accepted 26 August 2013

Academic Editor: Nico Boon

Copyright © 2013 Ehsan Oskoueian et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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