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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 352414, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/352414
Review Article

The Importance of the Nurse Cells and Regulatory Cells in the Control of T Lymphocyte Responses

Laboratorio de Inmunobiología, Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México, DF, Mexico

Received 10 August 2012; Accepted 12 October 2012

Academic Editor: Luis I. Terrazas

Copyright © 2013 María Guadalupe Reyes García and Fernando García Tamayo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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