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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 365192, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/365192
Review Article

The Possible Role of Mena Protein and Its Splicing-Derived Variants in Embryogenesis, Carcinogenesis, and Tumor Invasion: A Systematic Review of the Literature

1Department of Pathology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Targu-Mures, 38 Ghe Marinescu Street, 540193 Targu Mures, Romania
2Department of Dermatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Targu-Mures, 540193 Targu Mures, Romania
3Department of Public Health, University of Pecs, Medical School, Szigeti Street 12, Pecs 7624, Hungary

Received 7 April 2013; Revised 16 June 2013; Accepted 2 July 2013

Academic Editor: Claus-Peter Richter

Copyright © 2013 Simona Gurzu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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