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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 391389, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/391389
Review Article

Antitumoral Potential of Tunisian Snake Venoms Secreted Phospholipases A2

1Laboratoire des Venins et Biomolecules Therapeutiques, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13, Place Pasteur, 1002 Tunis, Tunisia
2Université de Tunis el Manar, 1068 Tunis, Tunisia
3Centre de Recherche en Oncologie Biologique et Oncopharmacologie (CRO2), INSERM UMR 911, Marseille, France
4Université d'Aix-Marseille, Marseille, France
5Faculté de Médecine de Tunis, 1007 Tunis, Tunisia

Received 19 July 2012; Accepted 4 September 2012

Academic Editor: Luis A. Ponce Soto

Copyright © 2013 Raoudha Zouari-Kessentini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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