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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 403415, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/403415
Research Article

Knowledge and Skill Retention of In-Service versus Preservice Nursing Professionals following an Informal Training Program in Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Repeated-Measures Quasiexperimental Study

1Department of Pediatrics, PGIMER, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi 110001, India
2Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India

Received 5 April 2013; Revised 22 June 2013; Accepted 23 June 2013

Academic Editor: Joseph Telfair

Copyright © 2013 Jhuma Sankar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Our objective was to compare the impact of a training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on the knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses at prespecified time points. This repeated-measures quasiexperimental study was conducted in the pediatric emergency and ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital between January and March 2011. We assessed the baseline knowledge and skills of nursing staff (in-service nurses) and final year undergraduate nursing students (preservice nurses) using a validated questionnaire and a skill checklist, respectively. The participants were then trained on pediatric CPR using standard guidelines. The knowledge and skills were reassessed immediately after training and at 6 weeks after training. A total of 74 participants—28 in-service and 46 preservice professionals—were enrolled. At initial assessment, in-service nurses were found to have insignificant higher mean knowledge scores (6.6 versus 5.8, ) while the preservice nurses had significantly higher skill scores (6.5 versus 3.2, ). Immediately after training, the scores improved in both groups. At 6 weeks however, we observed a nonuniform decline in performance in both groups—in-service nurses performing better in knowledge test (10.5 versus 9.1, ) and the preservice nurses performing better in skill test (9.8 versus 7.4, ). Thus, knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses in pediatric CPR improved with training. In comparison to preservice nurses, the in-service nurses seemed to retain knowledge better with time than skills.