About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 451349, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/451349
Research Article

CX3CR1 Receptor Polymorphisms, Th1 Cell Recruitment, and Acute Myocardial Infarction Outcome: Looking for a Link

Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy

Received 30 April 2013; Revised 6 September 2013; Accepted 12 September 2013

Academic Editor: Nishath Altaf

Copyright © 2013 S. Pucci et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. I. Gotlieb, “Atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes,” Cardiovascular Pathology, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 181–184, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. A. Mauriello, G. Sangiorgi, S. Fratoni et al., “Diffuse and active inflammation occurs in both vulnerable and stable plaques of the entire coronary tree: a histopathologic study of patients dying of acute myocardial infarction,” Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol. 45, no. 10, pp. 1585–1593, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. P. Fraticelli, M. Sironi, G. Bianchi et al., “Fractalkine (CX3CL1) as an amplification circuit of polarized Th1 responses,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 107, no. 9, pp. 1173–1181, 2001. View at Scopus
  4. R. Bonecchi, G. Bianchi, P. P. Bordignon et al., “Differential expression of chemokine receptors and chemotactic responsiveness of type 1 T helper cells (Th1s) and Th2s,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 187, no. 1, pp. 129–134, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. J. F. Bazan, K. B. Bacon, G. Hardiman et al., “A new class of membrane-bound chemokine with a CX3C motif,” Nature, vol. 385, no. 6617, pp. 640–642, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. C. Murdoch and A. Finn, “Chemokine receptors and their role in vascular biology,” Journal of Vascular Research, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 1–7, 2000. View at Scopus
  7. C. Murdoch and A. Finn, “Chemokine receptors and their role in inflammation and infectious diseases,” Blood, vol. 95, no. 10, pp. 3032–3043, 2000. View at Scopus
  8. C. Combadiere, K. Salzwedel, E. D. Smith, H. L. Tiffany, E. A. Berger, and P. M. Murphy, “Identification of CX3CR1. A chemotactic receptor for the human CX3C chemokine fractalkine and a fusion coreceptor for HIV-1,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 273, no. 37, pp. 23799–23804, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. G. A. Chapman, K. E. Moores, J. Gohil et al., “The role of fractalkine in the recruitment of monocytes to the endothelium,” European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 392, no. 3, pp. 189–195, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. T. Kasama, K. Wakabayashi, M. Sato, R. Takahashi, and T. Isozaki, “Relevance of the CX3CL1/fractalkine-CX3CR1 pathway in vasculitis and vasculopathy,” Translational Research, vol. 155, no. 1, pp. 20–26, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. García-Álvarez, J. Berenguer, M. Guzmán-Fulgencio et al., “High plasma fractalkine (CX3CL1) levels are associated with severe liver disease in HIV/HCV co-infected patients with HCV genotype 1,” Cytokine, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 244–248, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. P. Lesnik, C. A. Haskell, and I. F. Charo, “Decreased atherosclerosis in CX3CR1-/- mice reveals a role for fractalkine in atherogenesis,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 111, no. 3, pp. 333–340, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. M. Stolla, J. Pelisek, M.-L. von Brühl, A. Schäfer, V. Barocke, and P. Heider, “Fractalkine is expressed in early and advanced atherosclerotic lesions and supports monocyte recruitment via CX3CR1,” PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 8, Article ID e43572, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. J. K. Damås, A. Boullier, T. Wæhre et al., “Expression of fractalkine (CX3CL1) and its receptor, CX3CR1, is elevated in coronary artery disease and is reduced during statin therapy,” Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 25, no. 12, pp. 2567–2572, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. M. Fong, L. A. Robinson, D. A. Steeber et al., “Fractalkine and CX3CR1 mediate a novel mechanism of leukocyte capture, firm adhesion, and activation under physiologic flow,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 188, no. 8, pp. 1413–1419, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. D. Moatti, S. Faure, F. Fumeron et al., “Polymorphism in the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 as a genetic risk factor for coronary artery disease,” Blood, vol. 97, no. 7, pp. 1925–1928, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. N. Singh, N. Sinha, S. Kumar, C. M. Pandey, and S. Agrawal, “Polymorphism in chemokine receptor genes and risk of acute myocardial infarction in North Indian population,” Molecular Biology Reports, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 2753–2759, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. Mauriello, G. Sangiorgi, S. Fratoni et al., “Diffuse and active inflammation occurs in both vulnerable and stable plaques of the entire coronary tree: a histopathologic study of patients dying of acute myocardial infarction,” Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol. 45, no. 10, pp. 1585–1593, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. G. K. Hansson and A. Hermansson, “The immune system in atherosclerosis,” Nature Immunology, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 204–212, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. H. Umehara, E. Bloom, T. Okazaki, N. Domae, and T. Imai, “Fractalkine and vascular injury,” Trends in Immunology, vol. 22, no. 11, pp. 602–607, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. H. Umehara, S. Goda, T. Imai et al., “Fractalkine, a CX3C-chemokine, functions predominantly as an adhesion molecule in monocytic cell line THP-1,” Immunology and Cell Biology, vol. 79, no. 3, pp. 298–302, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. L. Lasagni, M. Francalanci, F. Annunziato et al., “An alternatively spliced variant of CXCR3 mediates the inhibition of endothelial cell growth induced by IP-10, Mig, and I-TAC, and acts as functional receptor for platelet factor 4,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 197, no. 11, pp. 1537–1549, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. S. Jung, J. Aliberti, P. Graemmel et al., “Analysis of fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 function by targeted deletion and green fluorescent protein reporter gene insertion,” Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol. 20, no. 11, pp. 4106–4114, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. D. H. McDermott, J. P. J. Halcox, W. H. Schenke et al., “Association between polymorphism in the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 and coronary vascular endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis,” Circulation Research, vol. 89, no. 5, pp. 401–407, 2001. View at Scopus
  25. H. Umehara and T. Imai, “Role of fractalkine in leukocyte adhesion and migration and in vascular injury,” Drug News and Perspectives, vol. 14, no. 8, pp. 460–464, 2001. View at Scopus
  26. H. Fujimoto, Y. Tanaka, Z.-J. Liu et al., “Down-regulation of α6 integrin, an anti-oncogene product, by functional cooperation of H-Ras and c-Myc,” Genes to Cells, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 337–343, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. M. Kimoli, S. Miyakis, P. Georgakopoulos, E. Noefytou, A. D. Achimastos, and D. A. Spandidos, “Polymorphisms of fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 gene in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis,” Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 604–610, 2009.