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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 458989, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/458989
Research Article

Characterization of Schizophrenia Adverse Drug Interactions through a Network Approach and Drug Classification

1Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
2Center for Quantitative Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
3Mental Health Service Line, Washington VA Medical Center, 50 Irving St. NW, Washington, DC 20422, USA
4Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
5Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37212, USA
6Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA

Received 5 July 2013; Accepted 8 August 2013

Academic Editor: Bairong Shen

Copyright © 2013 Jingchun Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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