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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 459169, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/459169
Clinical Study

Role of Toll-Interacting Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Leprosy Mexican Patients

1Centro Universitario de Tonalá, Universidad de Guadalajara, Tonalá, Jal., Mexico
2Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jal., Mexico
3CIINDE Universidad de Guadalajara/Instituto Dermatológico de Jalisco “Dr. Jose Barba Rubio”, Sierra Mojada 950, Edificio P. Primer Nivel, Colonia Independencia, 44340 Guadalajara, Jal., Mexico
4Genetic Division Department, Biomedical Research Center West, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Sierra Mojada 800, Colonia Independencia, 44340 Guadalajara, Jal., Mexico

Received 30 April 2013; Revised 9 September 2013; Accepted 14 September 2013

Academic Editor: Yoshio Ishibashi

Copyright © 2013 Margarita Montoya-Buelna et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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