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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 461230, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/461230
Review Article

Heat Shock Proteins: Stimulators of Innate and Acquired Immunity

1ImmunoBiology Limited, Babraham Research Campus, Cambridge CB22 3AT, UK
2Aeras, 1405 Research Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
3NIBSC, Blanche Lane, South Mimms, Potters Bar EN6 3QG, UK

Received 11 February 2013; Accepted 9 May 2013

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2013 Camilo A. Colaco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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