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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 471792, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/471792
Research Article

The StartReact Effect on Self-Initiated Movements

1Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/Ciudad Universitaria S/N, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2National School on Occupational Medicine, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, C/Sinesio Delgado 4, 28029 Madrid, Spain
3Division of Rehabilitation, Aged Care and Allied Health, Repatriation General Hospital, Flinders University, Daw Park, SA 5043, Australia
4EMG Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Clínic, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Institut d’Investigacio Biomedica August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Facultad de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Calle Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain

Received 30 April 2013; Revised 17 July 2013; Accepted 1 August 2013

Academic Editor: Jean Blouin

Copyright © 2013 J. M. Castellote et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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