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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 485196, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/485196
Research Article

Investigating Mechanisms of Alkalinization for Reducing Primary Breast Tumor Invasion

Arizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona, 1501 N. Campbell Avenue, Suite 2349, P.O. Box 245030, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA

Received 30 January 2013; Accepted 16 June 2013

Academic Editor: M. Piacentini

Copyright © 2013 Ian F. Robey and Lance A. Nesbit. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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