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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 493643, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/493643
Research Article

Mood and Memory Function in Ovariectomised Rats Exposed to Social Instability Stress

1Department of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
2Department of Psychiatry, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
3Department of Anatomy, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
4Department of Neuroscience, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
5Department of Community Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia

Received 4 April 2013; Accepted 25 May 2013

Academic Editor: Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi

Copyright © 2013 Badriya Al-Rahbi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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