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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 498583, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/498583
Review Article

Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and Its Antigens

Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida De los Barrios 1, Los Reyes Iztacala, 54090 Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico

Received 10 August 2012; Revised 7 November 2012; Accepted 14 November 2012

Academic Editor: Miriam Rodríguez-Sosa

Copyright © 2013 Alberto N. Peón et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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