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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 503047, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/503047
Research Article

Characterization of Cardiac-Resident Progenitor Cells Expressing High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity

1Department of Cardiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Avenue du Bugnon, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
2Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Avenue du Bugnon, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
3Molecular Cardiology Laboratory, Fondazione Cardiocentro Ticino, Via Tesserete 48, 6900 Lugano, Switzerland

Received 16 August 2012; Revised 29 October 2012; Accepted 2 November 2012

Academic Editor: Franca Di Meglio

Copyright © 2013 Marc-Estienne Roehrich et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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