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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 509714, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/509714
Research Article

RNase P-Associated External Guide Sequence Effectively Reduces the Expression of Human CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 and Inhibits the Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1

1State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Hubei, Wuhan 430072, China
2Program in Comparative Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
3School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

Received 2 August 2012; Revised 17 October 2012; Accepted 25 October 2012

Academic Editor: Edouard Cantin

Copyright © 2013 Wenbo Zeng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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