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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 510736, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/510736
Research Article

Antibacterial, Antioxidant, and Anticholinesterase Activities of Plant Seed Extracts from Brazilian Semiarid Region

1Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60440-970 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
2Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 50, 6229ER Maastricht, The Netherlands
3Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60430-270 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
4Departamento de Química Orgânica e Inorgânica, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60440-970 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
5Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Campus Senador Helvídio Nunes de Barros, Universidade Federal do Piauí, 64600-000 Picos, PI, Brazil
6Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Avenida Universitária, s/n, 64049-550 Teresina, PI, Brazil
7Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do Pici, 60451-970 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil

Received 9 July 2013; Accepted 28 October 2013

Academic Editor: Kazim Husain

Copyright © 2013 Davi Felipe Farias et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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