About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 524820, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/524820
Review Article

Nutrition and the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

1Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Number 5 Donghai Middle Road, Qingdao 266071, China
2College of Medicine and Pharmaceutics, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China

Received 10 April 2013; Revised 5 June 2013; Accepted 10 June 2013

Academic Editor: Mikko Hiltunen

Copyright © 2013 Nan Hu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that accounts for the major cause of dementia, and the increasing worldwide prevalence of AD is a major public health concern. Increasing epidemiological studies suggest that diet and nutrition might be important modifiable risk factors for AD. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, B vitamins, polyphenols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial to AD, and consumptions of fish, fruits, vegetables, coffee, and light-to-moderate alcohol reduce the risk of AD. However, many of the results from randomized controlled trials are contradictory to that of epidemiological studies. Dietary patterns summarizing an overall diet are gaining momentum in recent years. Adherence to a healthy diet, the Japanese diet, and the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of AD. This paper will focus on the evidence linking many nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns to AD.