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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 542363, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/542363
Review Article

The Role of Calprotectin in Pediatric Disease

1Department of Pediatric Surgery, Alexandroupolis University Hospital, Democritus University of Thrace School of Medicine, Dragana, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
2Second Department of Propedeutic Surgery, “Laiko” General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, 17 Agiou Thoma Street, 11527 Athens, Greece
3Third Department of General Surgery, “Attiko” General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, 1 Rimini Street, 1246 Athens, Greece
4Department of Pediatrics, Alexandroupolis University Hospital, Democritus University of Thrace School of Medicine, Dragana, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece

Received 29 April 2013; Revised 6 August 2013; Accepted 26 August 2013

Academic Editor: Gianluca Terrin

Copyright © 2013 George Vaos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Calprotectin (CP) is a calcium- and zinc-binding protein of the S100 family expressed mainly by neutrophils with important extracellular activity. The aim of the current review is to summarize the latest findings concerning the role of CP in a diverse range of inflammatory and noninflammatory conditions among children. Increasing evidence suggests the implication of CP in the diagnosis, followup, assessment of relapses, and response to treatment in pediatric pathological conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, celiac disease, intestinal cystic fibrosis, acute appendicitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, Kawasaki disease, polymyositis-dermatomyositis, glomerulonephritis, IgA nephropathy, malaria, HIV infection, hyperzincemia and hypercalprotectinemia, and cancer. Further studies are required to provide insights into the actual role of CP in these pathological processes in pediatrics.