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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 543294, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/543294
Research Article

Development of a Generic Microfluidic Device for Simultaneous Detection of Antibodies and Nucleic Acids in Oral Fluids

1Rheonix, Inc., Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
2Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY 10010, USA
3Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, S-01-030, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
4Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA
5Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

Received 19 October 2012; Accepted 30 December 2012

Academic Editor: Joy Scaria

Copyright © 2013 Zongyuan Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A prototype dual-path microfluidic device (Rheonix CARD) capable of performing simultaneously screening (antigen or antibody) and confirmatory (nucleic acid) detection of pathogens is described. The device fully integrates sample processing, antigen or antibody detection, and nucleic acid amplification and detection, demonstrating rapid and inexpensive “sample-to-result” diagnosis with performance comparable to benchtop analysis. For the chip design, a modular approach was followed allowing the optimization of individual steps in the sample processing process. This modular design provides great versatility accommodating different disease targets independently of the production method. In the detection module, a lateral flow (LF) protocol utilizing upconverting phosphor (UCP) reporters was employed. The nucleic acid (NA) module incorporates a generic microtube containing dry reagents. Lateral flow strips and PCR primers determine the target or disease that is diagnosed. Diagnosis of HIV infection was used as a model to investigate the simultaneous detection of both human antibodies against the virus and viral RNA. The serological result is available in less than 30 min, and the confirmation by RNA amplification takes another 60 min. This approach combines a core serological portable diagnostic with a nucleic acid-based confirmatory test.