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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 561098, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/561098
Review Article

Enhancing the Migration Ability of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells by Targeting the SDF-1/CXCR4 Axis

1Canadian Blood Services, Research and Development, Edmonton, AB, Canada
2Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, CBS Building, 8249-114 Street NW, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2R8

Received 16 August 2013; Revised 9 October 2013; Accepted 28 October 2013

Academic Editor: Ulrich Kneser

Copyright © 2013 Leah A. Marquez-Curtis and Anna Janowska-Wieczorek. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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