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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 564534, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/564534
Review Article

Neuroprotective Function of 14-3-3 Proteins in Neurodegeneration

1Neural Plasticity Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kamikitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506, Japan
2Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4

Received 26 August 2013; Accepted 17 October 2013

Academic Editor: Anna Maria Lavezzi

Copyright © 2013 Tadayuki Shimada et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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