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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 565218, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/565218
Research Article

Hippocampal Gene Expression of Deiodinases 2 and 3 and Effects of 3,5-Diiodo-L-Thyronine T2 in Mouse Depression Paradigms

1Institute of Physiologically Active Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Severnii proesd 1, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432, Russia
2Timantti AB, Sundbyberg 104, 174 07 Stockholm, Sweden
3Department of Preventive Medicine, Maastricht Medical Center in Annadal, Becanusstraat 17 A0, 6216 BX Maastricht, The Netherlands
4Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin, WIMR 3016, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705, USA
5Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Baltiyskaia 8, Moscow 125315, Russia
6Department of Neuroscience, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 40, NL 6229 ER Maastricht, The Netherlands
7Institute for Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, New University of Lisbon, Rua da Junqueira 96, 1349-008 Lisbon, Portugal

Received 31 August 2013; Revised 3 November 2013; Accepted 3 November 2013

Academic Editor: Paul M. Tulkens

Copyright © 2013 Natalyia Markova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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