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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 568354, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/568354
Review Article

Plasticity in the Human Visual Cortex: An Ophthalmology-Based Perspective

1Departamento de Oftalmologia, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, 3000 Coimbra, Portugal
2Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra, Portugal
3Visual Neuroscience Laboratory, IBILI, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra, Portugal

Received 30 April 2013; Revised 5 August 2013; Accepted 19 August 2013

Academic Editor: Yoshiki Kaneoke

Copyright © 2013 Andreia Martins Rosa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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