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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 589130, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/589130
Review Article

Role of Gap Junctions and Hemichannels in Parasitic Infections

1Departamento de Fisiología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 8330025 Santiago, Chile
2Laboratorio de Fisiología Experimental (EPhyL), Instituto Antofagasta (IA), Universidad de Antofagasta, 1270300 Antofagasta, Chile
3Inmunología, Departamento de Tecnología Médica, Universidad de Antofagasta, 1270300 Antofagasta, Chile
4Department of Pathology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8023, USA
5Unidad de Parasitología Molecular, Facultad Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Antofagasta, 1270300 Antofagasta, Chile

Received 21 May 2013; Revised 7 August 2013; Accepted 26 August 2013

Academic Editor: Christophe Duranton

Copyright © 2013 José Luis Vega et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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