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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 591931, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/591931
Review Article

The Role of MicroRNAs in Cancer Susceptibility

1Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Università “Magna Graecia” di Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
2Unità Operativa di Genetica Medica, Università “Magna Graecia” di Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
3Dipartimento di Medicina Molecolare, Università di Roma “Sapienza”, 00161 Roma, Italy
4Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Università “Magna Graecia” di Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
5Centro Oncologico Fondazione T. Campanella, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy

Received 19 December 2012; Accepted 14 February 2013

Academic Editor: Anna Di Gregorio

Copyright © 2013 Rodolfo Iuliano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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