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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 598056, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/598056
Research Article

Biocompatibility Assessment of Novel Collagen-Sericin Scaffolds Improved with Hyaluronic Acid and Chondroitin Sulfate for Cartilage Regeneration

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Bucharest, 91-95 Splaiul Independentei, 050095 Bucharest, Romania
2Collagen Department, Leather and Footwear Research Institute, 93 Ion Minulescu, 031215 Bucharest, Romania
3Advanced Polymer Materials Group, Department of Bioresources and Polymer Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest, 149 Calea Victoriei, 010072 Bucharest, Romania
4Molecular Biology and Pathology Research Lab “Molimagex”, University Hospital Bucharest, 169 Splaiul Independentei, 050098 Bucharest, Romania
5Department of Histology, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Dentistry, Vasile Goldis Western University of Arad, 1 Feleacului, 310396 Arad, Romania
6Department of Experimental and Applied Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Vasile Goldis Western University of Arad, 86 Rebreanu, 310414 Arad, Romania

Received 19 July 2013; Accepted 27 September 2013

Academic Editor: Antonio Salgado

Copyright © 2013 Sorina Dinescu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) applications are focused towards the use of implantable biohybrids consisting of biodegradable scaffolds combined with in vitro cultured cells. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) were identified as the most potent prochondrogenic factors used to design new biomaterials for CTE, while human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were proved to display high chondrogenic potential. In this context, our aim was not only to build novel 3D porous scaffolds based on natural compounds but also to evaluate their in vitro biological performances. Therefore, for prospective CTE, collagen-sericin (Coll-SS) scaffolds improved with HA (5% or 10%) and CS (5% or 10%) were used as temporary physical supports for ASCs and were analyzed in terms of structural, thermal, morphological, and swelling properties and cytotoxic potential. To complete biocompatibility data, ASCs viability and proliferation potential were also assessed. Our studies revealed that Coll-SS hydrogels improved with 10% HA and 5% CS displayed the best biological performances in terms of cell viability, proliferation, morphology, and distribution. Thus, further work will address a novel 3D system including both HA 10% and CS 5% glycoproteins, which will probably be exposed to prochondrogenic conditions in order to assess its potential use in CTE applications.