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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 601361, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/601361
Review Article

Molecular Functions of Thyroid Hormones and Their Clinical Significance in Liver-Related Diseases

1Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
2Department of Nursing, Chang-Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan

Received 4 February 2013; Revised 14 May 2013; Accepted 28 May 2013

Academic Editor: Elena Orlova

Copyright © 2013 Hsiang Cheng Chi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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