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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 610727, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/610727
Clinical Study

Cerebral Activation during Von Frey Filament Stimulation in Subjects with Endothelin-1-Induced Mechanical Hyperalgesia: A Functional MRI Study

1Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium
2Laboratory for Pain Research, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
3Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium

Received 30 June 2013; Accepted 14 August 2013

Academic Editor: Gjumrakch Aliev

Copyright © 2013 Guy H. Hans et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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