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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 615901, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/615901
Research Article

Strength and Body Composition Changes in Recreationally Strength-Trained Individuals: Comparison of One versus Three Sets Resistance-Training Programmes

1Institute for Clinical Exercise & Health Science, University of the West of Scotland, Hamilton ML3 0JB, UK
2Health and Exercise Science Research Unit, School of Applied Sciences, University of South Wales, Pontypridd CF37 1DL, UK
3Cardiff School of Sport, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff CF23 6XD, UK
4Human Performance Laboratory, Technological and Higher Education Institute of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Received 15 April 2013; Revised 30 July 2013; Accepted 8 August 2013

Academic Editor: Kazushige Goto

Copyright © 2013 J. S. Baker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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