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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 638348, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/638348
Research Article

Titanium Surface Coating with a Laminin-Derived Functional Peptide Promotes Bone Cell Adhesion

1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749, Republic of Korea
2Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749, Republic of Korea
3Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749, Republic of Korea

Received 7 November 2012; Revised 4 March 2013; Accepted 4 March 2013

Academic Editor: Willy Zorzi

Copyright © 2013 Seung-Ki Min et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Laminin-derived peptide coatings can enhance epithelial cell adhesion to implants, and the positive effect of these peptides on bone cell adhesion has been anticipated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the improvement in bone cell attachment to and activity on titanium (Ti) scaffolds coated with a laminin-derived functional peptide, Ln2-P3 (the DLTIDDSYWYRI motif). Four Ti disc surfaces were prepared, and a human osteosarcoma (HOS) cell attachment test was performed to select two candidate surfaces for peptide coating. These two candidates were then coated with Ln2-P3 peptide, a scrambled peptide, or left uncoated to measure cell attachment to each surface, following which one surface was chosen to assess alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteogenic marker gene expression with quantitative real-time PCR. On the commercially pure Ti surface, the Ln2-P3 coating significantly increased cellular ALP activity and the expression levels of ALP and bone sialoprotein mRNA as compared with the scrambled peptide-coated and uncoated surfaces. In conclusion, although further in vivo studies are needed, the findings of this in vitro study indicate that the Ln2-P3-coated implant surface promotes bone cell adhesion, which has clinical implications for reducing the overall treatment time of dental implant therapy.