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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 652632, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/652632
Research Article

Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of an Alveolar Epithelial Cell Line to Airborne Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface: A Comparison with Conventional, Submerged Cell-Culture Conditions

1Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85758 Neuherberg, Germany
2Joint Mass Spectrometry Center, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstaedter LandstraBe 1, 85758 Neuherberg, Germany

Received 27 August 2012; Accepted 23 November 2012

Academic Editor: Irma Rosas

Copyright © 2013 Anke-Gabriele Lenz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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