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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 658270, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/658270
Review Article

“Zebrafishing” for Novel Genes Relevant to the Glomerular Filtration Barrier

1Division of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Strße 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany
2Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, P.O. Box 35, Old Bar Harbor Road, Salisbury Cove, ME 04672, USA

Received 2 April 2013; Accepted 15 July 2013

Academic Editor: Richard Tucker

Copyright © 2013 Nils Hanke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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