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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 679365, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/679365
Research Article

Sphingomyelinase Activity of Trichomonas vaginalis Extract and Subfractions

1División de Biología Celular y Molecular, Centro de Investigación Biomédica del Noreste, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Administración de Correo No. 4, 2 de abril 501 Colonia Independencia, 64720 Monterrey, NL, Mexico
2Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, División de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Monterrey, Avenida Morones Prieto 4500 Pte, 66238 San Pedro Garza García, NL, Mexico
3Departamento de Biología Celular y Genética, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, 66451 San Nicolás de los Garza, NL, Mexico
4Laboratorio de Enzimología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, UANL, San Nicolás de los Garza, NL, Mexico
5Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Avenida Manuel L Barragán S/N, San Nicolás de los Garza, NL, Mexico

Received 29 April 2013; Accepted 10 July 2013

Academic Editor: Rana Chattopadhyay

Copyright © 2013 Francisco González-Salazar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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