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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 685142, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/685142
Review Article

Inflammation-Related Effects of Diesel Engine Exhaust Particles: Studies on Lung Cells In Vitro

Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Lovisenberggaten 8, 0403 Oslo, Norway

Received 10 October 2012; Revised 4 January 2013; Accepted 15 January 2013

Academic Editor: Tim Nawrot

Copyright © 2013 P. E. Schwarze et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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