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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 685641, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/685641
Review Article

Usefulness of Traditional Serum Biomarkers for Management of Breast Cancer Patients

Fondazione SDN IRCCS, Via E. Gianturco 113, 80143 Naples, Italy

Received 10 June 2013; Revised 6 September 2013; Accepted 9 September 2013

Academic Editor: Natasa Tosic

Copyright © 2013 Peppino Mirabelli and Mariarosaria Incoronato. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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