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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 690217, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/690217
Research Article

Hyaluronic Acid Derived from Other Streptococci Supports Streptococcus pneumoniae In Vitro Biofilm Formation

1Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Gyeonggi 410-773, Republic of Korea
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-705, Republic of Korea
3Chuncheon Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, 192-1 Hyoja 2-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-701, Republic of Korea

Received 16 April 2013; Revised 8 August 2013; Accepted 21 August 2013

Academic Editor: H. C. Van der Mei

Copyright © 2013 Mukesh Kumar Yadav et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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