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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 696343, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/696343
Research Article

Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Factor 6 Signaling Contributes to Control Host Lung Pathology but Favors Susceptibility against Toxocara canis Infection

1Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Avenue de los Barrios 1, Los Reyes Iztacala, Tlalnepantla 54090, MEX, Mexico City, DE, Mexico
2Laboratorio de Parasitología, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlán, UNAM, 54714 Mexico City, DE, Mexico
3Laboratorio de Histopatología, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlán, UNAM, 54714 Mexico City, DE, Mexico
4Carrera de Medicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, UNAM, 54090 Mexico City, DE, Mexico

Received 10 August 2012; Accepted 29 October 2012

Academic Editor: Miriam Rodríguez-Sosa

Copyright © 2013 Berenice Faz-López et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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