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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 734326, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/734326
Research Article

The Role of Insula-Associated Brain Network in Touch

1Integrative Rehabilitation Medicine Department, National Rehabilitation Hospital, National Research Center for Rehabilitation Technical Aids, Beijing, China
2Beijing Economic and Technological Development Zone, No. 1 Ronghuazhong Road, Beijing 100176, China
3China Rehabilitation Research Center, Beijing Boai Hospital, School of Rehabilitation Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100068, China

Received 16 April 2013; Revised 9 June 2013; Accepted 24 June 2013

Academic Editor: Tonio Ball

Copyright © 2013 Pengxu Wei and Ruixue Bao. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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