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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 740892, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/740892
Review Article

Increasing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Yield to Develop Mice with Human Immune Systems

1Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Room 361, Steven Spielberg Building, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Room 361, Steven Spielberg Building, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
3David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA

Received 25 September 2012; Revised 17 December 2012; Accepted 27 December 2012

Academic Editor: Rudi Beyaert

Copyright © 2013 Juan-Carlos Biancotti and Terrence Town. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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