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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 743509, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/743509
Review Article

A History of the Development of Brucella Vaccines

1Departamento de Microbiología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Prolongación Carpio y Plan de Ayala s/n, Col. Sto. Tomás, 11340 México, DF, Mexico
2Center for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA

Received 11 January 2013; Accepted 9 May 2013

Academic Editor: Adolfo Paz Silva

Copyright © 2013 Eric Daniel Avila-Calderón et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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