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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 756302, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/756302
Research Article

Promoter Hypermethylation of the EMP3 Gene in a Series of 229 Human Gliomas

1Neuro-Bio-Oncology Center, Policlinico di Monza Foundation (Vercelli)/Consorzio di Neuroscienze, University of Pavia, Via Pietro Micca, 29, 13100 Vercelli, Italy
2Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Via Santena 7, 10126 Turin, Italy

Received 17 May 2013; Revised 26 June 2013; Accepted 10 July 2013

Academic Editor: Akira Matsuno

Copyright © 2013 Marta Mellai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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