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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 757459, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/757459
Clinical Study

2-Hour Postload Serum Glucose Levels and Maternal Blood Pressure as Independent Predictors of Birth Weight in “Appropriate for Gestational Age” Neonates in Healthy Nondiabetic Pregnancies

1Biochemistry Department, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 35, 123, Muscat, Oman
2Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, P.O. Box 35, 123, Muscat, Oman
3College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 35, 123, Muscat, Oman

Received 30 April 2013; Revised 3 August 2013; Accepted 19 August 2013

Academic Editor: Winfried Randerath

Copyright © 2013 Jumana Saleh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Increased neonatal birth weight (NBW), often associated with diabetic pregnancies, is a recognized indicator of childhood obesity and future metabolic risk. Predictors of NBW in healthy non-diabetic pregnancies are not yet established. Here, we investigated the association of maternal parameters of healthy non-diabetic mothers with NBW of their “appropriate-for-gestational age” neonates. Methods. The study involved 36 healthy mother/infant pairs. Examined parameters included NBW, maternal age, first and last trimester (BMI), weight gain, fasting serum lipids and glucose, 2-hour postload glucose levels and blood pressure. Results. Postload-glucose levels were significantly higher in mothers of heavier neonates. ANOVA results indicated that 15% increase in postload-glucose levels corresponded to more than 0.5 Kg increase in NBW in the third tertile. NBW correlated positively with postload glucose levels, and negatively with systolic blood pressure. Regression analysis showed that the main predictors of NBW were postload-glucose levels ( , ), followed by systolic blood pressure ( , ), together predicting 31.7% NBW variation. Conclusion. This study highlights that increased maternal postload sugar levels and blood pressure, within the normal range, highly predicts NBW of healthy mothers. These findings may provide focus for early dietary intervention measures to avoid future risks to the mother and baby.