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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 757490, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/757490
Research Article

Targeted Resequencing Reveals ALK Fusions in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinomas Detected by FISH, Immunohistochemistry, and Real-Time RT-PCR: A Comparison of Four Methods

1Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21 (Haartmaninkatu 3), 00014 Helsinki, Finland
2Department of Pathology, HUSLAB, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 400, 00029 HUS, Finland
3Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 340, 00029 HUS, Finland
4Lab21 Ltd, 184 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0GA, UK
5Technology Centre, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 20, 00014 Helsinki, Finland

Received 19 September 2012; Accepted 9 December 2012

Academic Editor: Akanchha Kesari

Copyright © 2013 Katja Tuononen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements occur in a subgroup of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). The identification of these rearrangements is important for guiding treatment decisions. The aim of our study was to screen ALK gene fusions in NSCLCs and to compare the results detected by targeted resequencing with results detected by commonly used methods, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Furthermore, we aimed to ascertain the potential of targeted resequencing in detection of ALK-rearranged lung carcinomas. We assessed ALK fusion status for 95 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue specimens from 87 patients with NSCLC by FISH and real-time RT-PCR, for 57 specimens from 56 patients by targeted resequencing, and for 14 specimens from 14 patients by IHC. All methods were performed successfully on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue material. We detected ALK fusion in 5.7% (5 out of 87) of patients examined. The results obtained from resequencing correlated significantly with those from FISH, real-time RT-PCR, and IHC. Targeted resequencing proved to be a promising method for ALK gene fusion detection in NSCLC. Means to reduce the material and turnaround time required for analysis are, however, needed.