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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 805627, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/805627
Research Article

Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

1Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, 05508-000 São Paulo, Brazil
2Cell Signaling and Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Brazil
3Laboratory of Imunogenetics, Instituto Butantan, 05503-900 São Paulo, Brazil
4Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, 05508-900 São Paulo, Brazil

Received 3 December 2012; Revised 16 February 2013; Accepted 18 February 2013

Academic Editor: Alexandre de Paula Rogerio

Copyright © 2013 Juciane Maria de Andrade Castro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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