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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 815894, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/815894
Research Article

Differentially Methylated Loci Distinguish Ovarian Carcinoma Histological Types: Evaluation of a DNA Methylation Assay in FFPE Tissue

1Department of Population Health Research, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB, Canada T2S 3C3
2Departments of Medical Genetics and Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N2
3Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Calgary Laboratory Services, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 2T9
4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N2
5Department of Molecular Pathology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N2
6Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 1C9

Received 4 July 2013; Accepted 19 August 2013

Academic Editor: John P. Geisler

Copyright © 2013 Linda E. Kelemen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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